Food in Morocco

The Cheers Travel /
Morocco and Western Sahara - We travelled to Morocco on 24th Nov 2008 & came back home on 7th Dec 2008. / post by Siim Einfeldt


Posts from this trip

- Journey to Morocco and Western Sahara – Düsseldorf Weeze
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara - Welcome to Marrakech!
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – trip to Agadir
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Agadir, a place for tourists?
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – off to Laayoune, Western Sahara
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Laayoune, Western Sahara
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Laayoune, where’s the snitch?
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Laayoune, Western Sahara (meeting with Islam)
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – back to Agadir
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – hmm, occupation?
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Essaouira, anyone?
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Amsterdam, back in Morocco?
- Journey To Morocco and Western Sahara – Weeze, forgotten village?
- Driving in morocco – all hell’s broken loose
- Morocco - work and poverty
- Hotels in Morocco – you get more than you pay for
- Morocco and dealing with street sellers
- Students and English teachers in Morocco
- Food in Morocco
- Prices in Morocco / Morocco price guide
- Morocco myths and reality
- Most common mistakes travelers make
- When searching for cheap airline tickets
I don’t know if you should go to Morocco if you wanted to have a holiday full of different great food. But then again, I wouldn’t send you to any country under these circumstances – I’d just suggest you to go shopping in the supermarket.



But the food in Morocco is good. I won’t even talk about the salads and drinks you can get before you start eating your main course – in most cases they are good but I’d still go with French food instead. Some most traditional foods in Morocco are Tajin (Moroccan tagine) and Couscous. Sandwiches, mint tea and fresh orange juice is usually offered everywhere as well, and chicken, variety of fish. And of course, there’s one thing I can’t forget – coffee! And then some more. As that’s what most of the local people seem to be doing in Morocco from dawn ‘til dusk anyway – drinking coffee that is. In many cases it seems that’s all they do. And of course, any kind of omelets, soup called Harira are quite common as well.

I couldn’t possibly tell you about all the foods out there, so instead I thought I’d just mention the ones I tried myself. And I must say it was all good. And the local beer of course – Flag or Stork – they really taste great.



One thing it might be difficult to get used to is how the food is made. Often, in not the cleanest places on the streets you see two people working on the food – your fish going from one hand to another and no, those hands don’t seem to be too clean to start with. That’s something what might be hard to get used to. However, by the end of the day the food is good, usually cheap (see my next post about prices in Morocco), and we didn’t catch any food poisonings or any other stomach problems – actually, I had some stomach problems before I got to Morocco but all was good in a few days. Go figure.














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